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A new chapter in the storied history of Patek Philippe calendar timepieces

Never before has the manufacture introduced a wristwatch that displays the day, the date, and the month on a single line as exemplified by the new Ref. 5236P-001, which premieres in an elegant platinum case with a blue dial.

A new chapter in the storied history of Patek Philippe calendar timepieces

Never before has the manufacture introduced a wristwatch that displays the day, the date, and the month on a single line as exemplified by the new Ref. 5236P-001, which premieres in an elegant platinum case with a blue dial.

"Even seemingly subtle changes deserve our most innovative ideas."

Thierry Stern, President.

"Even seemingly subtle changes deserve our most innovative ideas."

Thierry Stern, President.

As a family-owned company, our strong sense of the past encourages us to remain innovative. The new Perpetual Calendar demonstrates that at Patek Philippe, the boundaries of horology are not a restraining influence.

As a family-owned company, our strong sense of the past encourages us to remain innovative. The new Perpetual Calendar demonstrates that at Patek Philippe, the boundaries of horology are not a restraining influence.

A new face for a brand-defining grand complication
A new face for a brand-defining grand complication
An innovative display mechanism crowned by three patents

To assure the largest possible calendar display on a single line with optimized legibility, minimal energy consumption and superb reliability, Patek Philippe engineers developed a calendar display consisting of four rotating disks – one for the day, two for the date and one for the month – all four perfectly embedded in the same plane. This patented mechanism alone required 118 additional parts in comparison with a conventional perpetual calendar display.

In the following video, discover the inner workings of the new self-winding mechanical Caliber 31-260 PS QL.

An innovative display mechanism crowned by three patents

To assure the largest possible calendar display on a single line with optimized legibility, minimal energy consumption and superb reliability, Patek Philippe engineers developed a calendar display consisting of four rotating disks – one for the day, two for the date and one for the month – all four perfectly embedded in the same plane. This patented mechanism alone required 118 additional parts in comparison with a conventional perpetual calendar display.

In the following video, discover the inner workings of the new self-winding mechanical Caliber 31-260 PS QL.

Behind the scenes: building the In-line Perpetual Calendar

Take an exclusive peek into our workshops and appreciate the dedication, thoroughness and patience of our artisans as they assemble, hand-polish and case up the components of the ref. 5236P-001 according to venerable Patek Philippe traditions.

Behind the scenes: building the In-line Perpetual Calendar

Take an exclusive peek into our workshops and appreciate the dedication, thoroughness and patience of our artisans as they assemble, hand-polish and case up the components of the ref. 5236P-001 according to venerable Patek Philippe traditions.

Perpetual calendars, a classic grand complications par excellence

Perpetual calendars have always been prominently featured in Patek Philippe’s collections, offering a wide range of design elements with analog or aperture displays and dial configurations.

Presented in 1925, the first wristwatch with this highly elaborate complication (movement No 97’975) is on display at the Patek Philippe Museum in Geneva (No. P-72). Also on display at the Patek Philippe Museum is a pocket watch from 1972 (No. P-1450) that features a panoramic aperture with a calendar system “à l’américaine” (month, date, day).

Perpetual calendars, a classic grand complications par excellence

Perpetual calendars have always been prominently featured in Patek Philippe’s collections, offering a wide range of design elements with analog or aperture displays and dial configurations.

Presented in 1925, the first wristwatch with this highly elaborate complication (movement No 97’975) is on display at the Patek Philippe Museum in Geneva (No. P-72). Also on display at the Patek Philippe Museum is a pocket watch from 1972 (No. P-1450) that features a panoramic aperture with a calendar system “à l’américaine” (month, date, day).

Perpetual Calendars

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